Quotation in Social Media: How Sharing Other People’s Words Could Increase Misinformation
 
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Department of Rhetoric, Pragmalinguistics and Journalism, Adam Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Polish and Classical Philology, Institute of Polish Philology, Polska
AUTOR DO KORESPONDENCJI
Agnieszka Maria Kula   

Department of Rhetoric, Pragmalinguistics and Journalism, Adam Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Polish and Classical Philology, Institute of Polish Philology, Fredry 10, 61-701, Poznań, Polska
Data nadesłania: 15-02-2022
Data ostatniej rewizji: 29-04-2022
Data akceptacji: 30-04-2022
Data publikacji: 30-06-2022
 
Studia Humanistyczne AGH 2022;21(2):81–98
 
SŁOWA KLUCZOWE
DZIEDZINY
STRESZCZENIE
According to the report “We Are Social” (2021), one of the most important reasons why Internet users take to social media platforms are: “stay up-to-date with news and current events”, “seeing what’s being talked about”, and “sharing and discussing opinions with others”. They are all focused on quoting. Our research helped us to confirm the dominance of posts with quotations in social media (the institutional broadcasters’ profiles). Quotation can take various forms to produce different results. Direct quotations include direct speech, text islets, and pseudo-quotations; indirect quotations include indirect speech and narrated speech. Direct quotations in the form of various direct references accounted for 73% of quotations on Twitter and 61% on Facebook. This confirms the tremendous popularity of quotations in direct speech  – senders avoid allegations of being partial; after all they show the facts that speak for themselves. It is strategies of the senders which increase misinformation.
ISSN:2084-3364